Heather's Staff Picks

Showing 1 - 12 of 17 items

In their zine, Jess X. Chen and Demian DinéYazhi’ define Solastalgia as “the pain experienced when the place where one resides or one loves is under immediate assault”

What follows is a collective meditation of grief-stricken prose, tender healing potential, and wild resistance that underlies an eco-feminist call to action.

The Overstory is a densely developed slow burn of a novel spanning generations. What at first appears as a hodgepodge of unrelated storylines, comes together masterfully to explore themes of conservation, interdependence, and activism. Powers' novel delivers a heavy, and at times, despairing message, but stick it out and you’ll find yourself pondering the agency of forests and other often invisible protagonists in the the stories we tell. 

A closeted photojournalist wakes up in his city only to discover he is a ghost. How did he die and who can he trust in this surreal new world? Maali Almeida only has seven moons to find out. What national and individual secrets will come to light and who will get caught up in the crosshairs along the way?

Karunatilaka’s magic realist tale is set against the backdrop of the Sri Lankan civil war. While readers will encounter a fair bit of accessible history and political satire, it was the complex intimacy shared among the major characters that kept me reading until the explosive end. 

One of the most deliciously satisfying reads of my ENTIRE life!! I remember slogging through The Once and Future King in high school while my inner baby butch longed to see myself somewhere on the pages. I wish I could go back in time and gift Samantha Shannon's masterpiece to teenage me. I'd let them know the future is Eadaz du Zala uq-Nana!

Yes this is a printmaking idea book, but its application extends to all visual artists. Crammed with examples of prints and printmaking techniques from all over the world, the curious creative will be rewarded with even the briefest flip-through of the pages. A deeper dive into the content and application of some of the techniques will have you leveling up in the studio!

This novella was the first piece of fiction that I ever held in my hand where I encountered queer characters and anarchist values together in a highly entertaining plot. I'm forever grateful to Killjoy for bringing the gift of fiction back into my life.

Plus..Demon Deer.

Trust me you'll want to follow protagonist Danielle Cain right into the next page-turning adventure The Barrow Will Send What it May

Neon Yang’s debut ignited my imagination with their thick descriptions of a world heavily adorned with gems and religious fanaticism. Misery Nomaki (she/they) has received word from a celestial messenger that she is to lead a holy war, Joan of Arc style, but as the story unfolds Misery increasingly questions the nature of reality and the intentions of the voice in their head. At the end I was left with similar questions and eager for more from Yang!

In Upstream, Mary Oliver offers a revealing look at the people, places, and things that have inspired and informed her work. While Oliver’s reflections on the influence of Emerson, Whitman, and Wordsworth are worthwhile reading, this collection resonated most deeply for me in Oliver’s meditations on her relationship to the flora and fauna she’s encountered in her life and the impressions they left on her. If you’re looking for a packable book to read under a tree on your next hike, this might be for you.

I found this book to be a fully formed delight of a read rooted in consensus and interspecies symbiosis. Not your average extraterrestrial tale, Emrys’s novel asks questions about the nature of family and identity while also considering the interplay of technology and ecology. A Half-Built Garden is an optimistic first contact story that left me hopeful we can actualize the worlds we imagine!

This exquisite deep dive into all things fungi ignited an inner curiosity that has me scouring damp forest floors with heart-shaped eyes, hoping for chances to observe these complex fruiting bodies we know as mushrooms. Mycophilia never looked so good as it does in Merlin Sheldrake’s capable hands!